Lens-Artists Challenge: Curves

My many strolls around the Botanical Garden with camera in hand have given me many files to peruse for curves. The hard part was deciding which ones to showcase. To make the decision I evaluated the quality of the photograph, whether there was inherent beauty or interest, and the bottom-line-truth is that these are the ones I like best of all. They trigger fond memories and personal thoughts, some of which I will also share. Here are my gifts of curves and words.

The colors of this orchid drew me in, but I really enjoy how curvy they are and how the curves create ruffles.
This fond caught my eye because it was the only curved one within a cluster of straight spined fonds. It made me wonder what makes some parts of plants grow in unexpected ways. I shouldn’t project human attributes to plants, but it sure seems like it is leaning down to hear the whispered thoughts of the plant growing beneath. Maybe I need to do more leaning in to listen to what nature is telling me.
I fell in love the moment I saw this ornamental cabbage, I felt the excitement of finding a treasure while photographing it, and experienced the satisfaction of creation as I did some editing to make it look like what I remembered. What’s not to love about the ruffly curves, the freshness of rain drops, the purple veins. The only thing that could make this more beautiful is a little more photographer practice.
We are moving ever closer to the time when we will be moving back to Michigan so… Where the mind goes so does my search of files. I love how the soft fall/early winter light hits the gentle curves of grasses going to seed.
We were camping along Lake Superior last summer when a storm came through, creating big waves. Waves are just water that is curving over itself so I searched my files for a good crop of a wave in action.
The waves grabbed my full attention and it was only after I felt I had more than enough photographs of the waves that I turned around and saw the beautiful curve of the grasses in the stiff wind. Gee whiz, how lucky that I found a reason to take even more photographs.
We stayed just outside Munising and there are a lot of water falls in the region. I took this photo of the Au Train water fall, through the trees as I was walking down the steep dirt road towards the small power plant. Those are some pretty curves in the rock layers. This was in the fall; I bet it would be really pretty in the spring when the snow melt and rains swells the river.
We will be visiting our daughter in Winston-Salem on our way home and this reminded me of the curvy roads of the Blue Ridge Mountain Trail. This is a two-fer – a curved road and a curved bridge. Lovely.
Two days ago was the first day of Spring so I felt it only appropriate to include some curves of spring flowers – taken at Hidden Lake Garden (MSU) in southern Michigan.

There have been a lot of interesting photographic representations of curves posted for this challenge. You can check them out here and learn how to join in the fun.

Silver and White on Manitoulin Island

The month of June is about over meaning that Jude will soon be changing her “white & silver” Life in Coulor to something else for July. I have been paralyzed by options as I scanned some of my favorite files. Today I told myself to just do it – so I picked a day on Manitoulin Island in Canada’s side of the Great Lakes. We have been thinking of returning but can’t until both countries decide that the pandemic is controlled enough to open the border. Doing this post seemed to sooth my soul’s need to soak in the calming atmosphere of the island.

Morning “Rush Hour” on a Quiet Manitoulin Island Lake in Canada
Bridal Falls
Silver Tin Roof on a Red Barn
A White Boat Waiting

I hope these photos helped you get a feel of this space in time and colour.

Multnomah Falls

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I could see Multnomah Falls from I-84 as we drove to our campground at Cascades Locks in the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon (the state of Washington is across the river) on our way back from Portland. I also saw the parking lot between the west and east bound lanes of the highway but we were too tired to stop. It is a tall waterfall, the tallest in Oregon, beautiful from a distance but I’m still learning how to photograph water falls (interpretation: I never feel like I’ve captured the power and beauty of them). I wanted to see it, but I wasn’t sure I could photograph it.

We took a day off from visiting great-grandkids to rest and do a little site-seeing on our own. My husband wanted to visit the Bonneville Dam and I chose Multnomah Falls.

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There are two falls and according to Native American lore the falls were created to win the heart of a young princess who wanted a private place to bath. The Natives who lived in this region were Chinookan.

To get to the falls, we walked through something like a subway tunnel, under the two east lanes and a railway track.

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The railway operated a stop at this site from 1884 until WWII using a timber bow-string truss bridge spanning the falls in the same location as the foot bridge. A lodge was built on this site, completed in 1925. It is a beautiful lodge that originally provided rooms and dining. According to Wikipedia the building was designed in the “Canadian” style, using cut limestone blocks laid irregularly, with a steep pitched gabled roof with cedar singles. It is rustic – like its setting but also very elegant.

I didn’t take many photos, instead sitting on a bench looking up at the falls, lost in a time long past. I thought about the steam locomotives chugging into the station and the type of people who were eager to live on the edge and/or had the means to do so in that era. When I processed my photos, the only option was Lightroom Color Preset “aged photo”. For this brief period of time I enjoyed a journey into romanticism.