Colorful Barn

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I love color and have a hard time turning any of my photographs into black and white. I tried with this one but couldn’t let go of the green grass and the blue sky. And of course the contrast of that very dark cloud that was either coming or going. You will have to image the drama of the cloud because, even though I was there and took the photo when we were leaving the campground on Manitoulin Island, I don’t remember the cloud’s story.

What drew me in about the barn were the traces of what once was. Maybe I felt an empathy with the body of this old barn – I know what it is like to have an old body with faint vestiges of what once was. This came up in conversations with JB a couple of times this week – how much of our long-age bodies has been lost, but also how we don’t feel any different as people than when we were dating well over half a century ago. I look at him and see the young man I found so hot back when we were teenagers. Even when I think about it for a minute or two, I realize that he is all he ever was but only better because he has relaxed and I have relaxed and our main goal is just to enjoy the life we have left.

I smile when I look at this barn because we understand, the barn and I, how important it is to get these sagging, worn out parts patched back together every once in a while. I’m beginning to understand that I, like this old barn, can be beautiful even though I have some titanium patches, need to apply some dabs of color here and there, and have a bit of a sag in places. Yes, I can learn a thing or two from this old barn in all it’s glorious color.

Fences on Manitoulin Island

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I’m still fascinated by these split rail fence – this fence is on Manitoulin Island in Ontario, Canada but I have also seen them along the Blue Ridge Mountain Parkway in the Eastern U.S., also a rocky land with thin soil.

This is not a photo I used in a previous post on these fences, because of the chain-link fence in the background. But for the WoollyMuse’s challenge “fences” this seemed perfect because there are three different kinds of fences in this uncropped photo.

Fences of Manitoulin Island

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We saw a lot of these split rail fences as we drove down lots of roads to get to destinations unknown. JB said he remembers seeing these fences as a child when he and his father visited his great uncle’s and great cousin’s farms in the Durham, Ontario area.

They were everywhere – on working farms, along the side of roads with no farms in sight, along the road with the woods creeping to overtake them. Some were fairly new and well maintained while others were in states of disrepair. And there was a variation of this split-rail fence.

I have a fascination with fences, I like their beauty but it isn’t a political issue where I believe land should be divided and fenced instead of allowing for free-range. I can’t come down on either side – but I appreciate good fences that are aesthetically pleasing and/or functional. These were functional.

As we drove and I observed the rocky fields I realized that a good portion of the island has very thin soil so it is impossible to dig post holes deep enough to keep a fence standing. Thus the people solved their problem by designing fencing that could support itself above ground. Another version of the second set of fencing is to build the triangle with two sides connected to the upright post and put large rocks on the side that lies on the ground. They used what they had – large numbers of cedar trees that are rot resistant and rocks and a little wire. I didn’t notice any duck tape or bubble gum.