Summer: Farmers’ Markets are a Comin’

One of my greatest joys of summer is going to the farmer’s market to obtain produce and flowers for a summer’s evening meal.

Here in Michigan vegetables are just beginning to ripen and farmers are beginning to show up for the markets. On my first three trips to local markets I found some strawberries, tomatoes, zuchinni, summer squash, snap peas, romaine lettuce, blueberries, and raspberries. I am hoping our favorite berry people, Ken & Janet, will be here next Tuesday with the very sweetest blueberries I have had anywhere.

Our daughter Sharon decided to work from our home in Michigan for July and August to escape the southern Texas heat and severe outbreak of Covid-19. She drove, bringing her canning jars and pressure cooker so she could can tomatoes and all the other fresh vegetables that will be harvested in those two months. We are especially eager to work together making relishes and salsas to fill our pantries.

It took me a while to narrow down what I like about summer when the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Summer came out this week. I could have posted on my summer garden, sewing in my three-season room, sprinklers, inland lakes with small docks, camping and picnics. Oh, and my purple porch swing, outings for ice cream, corn growing in the neighboring fields…

Sunset on the Gulf

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The time of day when the sun slides behind the horizon, pulling the day’s light behind it.

When time is suspended, between the end of this day and our approaching awareness of the one to come.

A soft time of light… not as harsh as our “should have” and “could have” awareness of a day with no second chances.

Like the forever horizon, will our lives reach forever, our days beyond measure? Or do we number them?

What did we do with our today, how will we use our tomorrow?

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In response to the 2020 Photo Challenge #14 – Horizontal Lines

Calming Beauty of Orchids

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My daughter and three grand-daughters are visiting in our small condo this week, so I’m feeling a miner assault on my solitude. Nothing serious – nothing some post processing and publishing of orchids can’t fix.

Jade Flower

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I am very familiar with the house plant varieties under the species of Crassula, and also know that house plants grow outdoors here in southern Florida. But this is a vine that is grown in two different locations in the Naples Botanical Garden, one with full sun and one that seems to be more shaded, and doesn’t seem to resemble the jade plants I’m familiar with.

What I do know is that it is very unique. What is pictured above is a mature blossom – new blossoms are a fairly uniform color of aqua that doesn’t seem natural to me.

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The first photo was taken on the boardwalk entrance, I had walked past it several time in January – each time marveling at its unique color. This week it was a “wow.” I lingered a long time taking photos from different perspectives and making sure the color in the view finder was true to the plant.

This seems to be a wonder of nature. Please let us know in the comments if you know where else it grows and other information. I’ll see if I can find someone at the garden who can give me more information.

Bitter Aloe

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The water lily/lotus blossoms are slow to open on my early morning trips to the botanical garden, probably wanting to sleep in until the sun is a bit higher in the sky. Consequently I haven’t spent as much time and focus at the lily ponds, instead moving through other parts of the garden and noticing other flowers in bloom.

There were several clumps of these Bitter Aloe blooms in the succulent garden and their hot, bright color drew me right in. I took several shots from different angles and this was instantly my favorite. This photograph documents the artistic flare of the head horticulturalists that design the beds. In coming blogs I will be focusing on beds of foliage plants that combine beautiful coloring and texture.