Lesson in Perspective

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This is my last post for Becky’s Square Perspective challenge and I’m a little late but it is still July 31 in the Eastern Time Zone of the U.S., so I can still post my most intriguing exploration of perspective. And think about what I learned through my camera.

The above square is a photo of the flower of a hens & chicks plant. I have some growing along the sidewalk in a really dry area leading to the front door. I’m not happy when they bloom because I’ve never found the flowers attractive.

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I bought this single “hen” at the garden center in the spring but realized when I got home that I already had some of these with reddish leaves. I set it down in the garden thinking I would get to it later, and much later (like weeks later) I found it on the ground still not planted. My compassion for all things living compelled me to dig a hole and stuff it in. There. End of guilt.

To my surprise it bloomed just a few weeks later. No spreading, no chicks, and no attention from me. Just this one little plant with a big ugly bloom coming out of it. And I heard it begging me to take its picture as I was recording what was blooming in my late July garden. It had been a while since I worked at this type of macro photography so I decided to take a stab at using my camera to get a closer look. My aging body doesn’t do well getting down low to peer at little things close to the ground.

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What a surprise when I edited photos to find how beautiful the small flowers are. There has to be a lesson here, don’t you think. If I hadn’t gotten close and intimate with this flower I didn’t like, didn’t see any beauty in, didn’t even respect or appreciate it enough to give it a proper planting – if I hadn’t taken the time to care and really look at it I wouldn’t have ever known how beautifully unique it is.

Morning Perspective

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This is one of my favorite new flowers, especially when the first rays of sun peak through the trees to the east in a way that lights it’s golden petals. I love the loose blooming style and the red stems. They also have a long blooming season and are easy to dead-head. I wish I knew it’s name as I don’t think I got an information tag with it and don’t even remember where I purchased it. Can anyone out there help me?

This is in response to Becky’s Square Perspective challenge.

Red in the Garden

I didn’t think I had many red flowers from the Naples Botanical Garden but as a went through my files I found a few. I really liked these, although red flowers usually aren’t my favorite and the are generally had to photograph in the harsh southwest Florida sun. There have been many that I took and then deleted because they turned out flat or had highlights that couldn’t be corrected.

I wasn’t able to label all of them because frequently I can’t get to tags and there isn’t a sign to be photographed for later reference. If you know what they are please let us know in the comments.

This post is brought to you in response to Nancy Merrill’s prompt of “red“.

Macro Monday – for Tuesday Enjoyment

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Irene doesn’t care if I’m a day late – she says that macro photographs can be posted all week long. If you enjoy viewing macro photography, you should visit Irene.

Butterfly Days

There have been a lot of butterflies around our home here in southern Florida – but very hard to photograph. They tend to disappear in the time it takes me to move my camera up to my eye. There have been even more in the Naples Botanical Garden.

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I think this is a Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebus Sennae) – what drew me in was how well camouflaged it is among the leaves. I found it funny that the spots on the wings look just like spots I have removed from leaves with Lightroom’s spot remover. How clever nature is.

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In the Brazilian Garden, I had a chat with one of the volunteers who pointed out an orchid that was growing in a tree behind the pavilion, down toward the lake. I headed down to take a look…

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but was distracted by this little beauty, an Atala.

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What my camera (or Lightroom) couldn’t capture to its fullest is the iridescent turquoise spots. My eye was drawn to the orange spot on the wing, down close to the body. And he posed for me – maybe enjoying the heat of the sun in contrast to the cool morning air.

My goal that morning was to enjoy the quiet and tranquility of early mornings in the garden, so I continued down the path along the lake toward the bench down the way. Little did I know I would be entertained by an osprey nesting on the other side of the lake.

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There were probably eggs in the nest because, after this stance to ward off the attacker, she spread her wings down low to shield the eggs. As I sat watching her I heard some people behind me commenting on a daisy tree. So I followed my curiosity a few feet behind me…

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and it was – a Daisy Tree, with lots of butterflies fluttering mostly around its 15-20 foot canopy. But a couple fluttered lower – within camera range.

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Notice how the orange spot on the wing is the same color as its body. I wonder if this spot confuses attackers so they hit the spot instead of the more vulnerable body. Any butterfly experts out there who knows the facts?

This is a new one for me – a Gulf Fritillary and I think it rises to the top of my list of beautiful butterflies. Even with its damaged wing.