Doctors Not Taking Pain Seriously

So often I hear that people go to doctors and the doctors don’t take their pain seriously. I also know that most doctors are afraid of prescribing narcotic pain medications for people who have fibromyalgia. As I have been looking for a new doctor, one that I went to said that he would be willing to work with me to keep symptoms controlled but he doesn’t prescribe narcotics for people with FM. Here is a link to an interesting article by a doctor who experienced chronic pain after a car accident. His experience with other doctors led him to change how he practiced medicine. http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/features/pain-doctor-chronic-pain-patient Related articles Is chronic pain in the brain? (blogs.abc.net.au) Doctors petition FDA to change labeling of painkillers (sacbee.com)

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Doctors & Patients: A Collaborative Relationship

When I developed my chronic condition the first thing that happened to my life was that I started spending a lot more time in my doctor’s office. So much time that I thought I should be collecting frequent flyer points towards a free office visit. Or I should be given my own examining room with a recliner, a stereo system, and wet bar – and stocked with my favorite magazines. The nurses kept telling me they were working on it in the basement. What I received was a lot of time to read novels while I waited and time to think about this relationship that was forming. Through these frequent visits we learned how to work together and formed an excellent working partnership. In a series of posts I will be sharing with you what I believe made our relationship work so well and especially what it was about the relationship that contributed to my healing. Originally I had written a section on what patients need from a doctor and then another section on what patients need to take to the relationship. As I was editing them for posting I realized that our relationship worked because we each brought complimentary qualities, knowledge and skills. We were collaborative partners with a shared goal of controlling my symptoms and increasing my functioning. According to Robin DiMatteo,[i] patients are most satisfied with partnerships rather than authoritarian control by the doctor because partnerships allow us […]

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A Working Partnership

Having a doctor with whom we have a good working partnership is very important for us when we have been diagnosed with a chronic illness and are trying to put our life back together after the diagnosis. It seems that patients are most satisfied with partnerships rather than authoritarian control by the doctor because partnerships allow us to participate more in healthcare choices, leading to more informed decision making, better follow through and adherence to the treatment plan, and ultimately better health and quality of life[i]. The type of relationship we need with a doctor is different under different circumstances, and our needs are influenced by personality characteristics, culture and can vary with the severity of symptoms and illness. But our reality when we are attempting to get the symptoms of  a chronic illness under control is that we will need to spend more time attending to our health care needs and this requires maintaining a good working partnership with a doctor. With the help from a doctor who we trust, our symptoms are more likely to improve, we are more likely to regain functioning, and will be able to sort out what activities from our old life we are able to keep or resume, which ones we can keep but in a modified form, and which ones we will let go of.  The excellent working partnership that I had with the family doctor who helped me get control of […]

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S/he Loves Me, S/he Loves Me Not: An Unequal Relationship

Since I lost my doctor (isn’t there a really old country song with a similar title?), I have been thinking a lot about the nature of the doctor/patient relationship. I’ve gone to doctors from whom I was basically purchasing a service but that isn’t a relationship. What I have been thinking about is the type of relationship that is built when a doctor helps us through a very difficult health problem by not only being competent but also being kind (see my post on Kindness). Being sick generally results in feelings of helplessness, and when we have an illness that we know doctors may not recognize and take seriously, we feel very vulnerable to not getting our health care needs met at best, and being abused at worst. What I have read (from both the patients’ and doctors’ perspectives) has led me to the conclusion that it isn’t the patients’ fault (although some patients can be very difficult and uncooperative) or the doctors’ fault (although some doctors can be disrespectful and rude). As my doctor told me, forming a good partnership is difficult because fibromyalgia is a gut wrenching problem for patients and a daunting one for doctors. Here are my thoughts on this relationship. One of the characteristics of a good doctor/patient relationship is that the doctor is genuinely caring and expresses concern about our pain and distress. The doctor is there for us when we feel our worst, are most fragile and are helpless in helping […]

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Loss of My Doctor

The doctor that I have had for the past 10 years seemed to be a gift from God. He understands how difficult fibromyalgia is for the patient, has an excellent problem-solving mind when presented with a new symptom, welcomes new information about treating FM, cares deeply about his patients, and gives the time a patient needs. There were a few rough spots through the 10 years, but our relationship seemed to be very satisfying for both of us. I thought he cared for me, appreciated how I worked with him, and I knew I respected him so I was dreading when he retired in a few years. When he retired I knew it would be hard but I also knew I would be happy for him and together we would find someone else to take care of my healthcare needs. What happened, however, was totally unexpected and is taking a long time to deal with emotionally. I have Medicare insurance and he made the decision to not accept Medicare reimbursement if congress didn’t stop the decrease in payment to health care professionals, so this meant he would no longer be willing to treat me. Congress did put a hold on the cut but I had already felt the wound of betrayal and after a lot of thought and tears made the decision to discharge him from having responsibility for my primary healthcare needs – I fired him. What pained me most was that he hadn’t […]

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